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Mote Endowment

The William R. and Lenore Mote Endowment

The FSU Mote Scholar in Marine Biology 2017-2018

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Professor Richard K. Grosberg
University of California, Davis
Department of Ecology and Evolution

Florida State University is pleased to present Dr. Richard K. Grosberg as the Mote Scholar in Marine Biology for 2017-2018. Dr. Grosberg’s research centers on building an understanding of the processes that govern the maintenance of genetic variation, the factors that influence the spatial and temporal distribution of genetic variation in natural populations, and mechanisms that limit conflict and promote the evolution of cooperation. He primarily study marine invertebrates, including anemones, hydroids, sea squirts, and snails; but also likes ants, fungi, and flowering plants. His field sites include the mudflats of the Gulf of California, the rocky shores of California, Oregon, and Washington, laboratory aquaria at Bodega Marine Lab, and the Great Barrier Reef. His research involves field and lab experiments, molecular genetics, population genetics, and phylogenetics.

At the University of California Davis, he is the Director of the Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute, which has the aim of addressing the challenges in stewardship of a changing coastal ocean (http://cmsi.ucdavis.edu/index.html).

As the FSU Mote Scholar in Marine Biology, Dr. Grosberg led a Research Working Group on Mating Systems in the Sea in July 2017.



The William R. and Lenore Mote Endowment

The FSU Mote Eminent Scholar in Marine Biology 2016-2017

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Professor Peter J. Edmunds
California State University Northridge
Department of Biology

Professor Peter J. Edmunds
California State University Northridge
Department of Biology

Florida State University is pleased to present Dr. Peter J. Edmunds, the first Mote Eminent Scholar in Marine Biology. Dr. Edmunds’s research on the physiological ecology and long-term dynamics of tropical reef corals elucidates temporal trends and provides a rich ecological context within which mechanistic research can be designed. He studies the organismal biology of individual corals in order to better understand their basic functionality and uses this knowledge to establish mechanistic links between organism performance and population and community dynamics. His research approach combines long-term studies on coral communities with detailed experiments to understand the mechanisms and drivers of coral community change.

From the relatively protected southern coast of St. John, US Virgin Islands, where he has maintained a long-term research program, to the dynamic exposed region of the French Polynesian Mo’orea Coral Reef in the South Pacific, Edmunds explores reefs at scales ranging from the individual to the ecosystem to understand the complex nature of their responses to climate change and ocean acidification. He is a Principal Investigator on a large collaborative project to address the long-term dynamics of coral communities in Moorea as part of the US Long Term Ecological Research program (http://mcr.lternet.edu/ Opens in a new window). Together, these two research programs provide unique opportunities to obtain the temporal detail necessary to understand changes to coral communities and develop management solutions.

Dr. Edmunds has written over 140 peer-reviewed publications and advised over 30 graduate students in his 30-year career. As the 1st FSU Mote Scholar in Marine Biology, Edmunds led a Research Working Group on the causes and consequences of metabolic scaling in clonal marine invertebrates.



Peter J. Edmunds – Coral Reefs & Climate change


The William R. and Lenore Mote Endowment

Previous Mote Eminent Scholars

2013-2014: Dr. Charles H. Peterson, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

2010-2011: Dr. Peter Auster, University of Connecticut

2007-2008: Dr. Kai Lorenzen, University of Florida, FL

2006-2007: Dr. Robert Warner, University of California, Santa Barbara

2004-2005: Dr. Larry B. Crowder, Stanford University Woods Institute

2004: Dr. Ana Maria Parma, National Research Council of Argentina

2001-2002: Dr. Carl Walters, University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2000: Dr. Marc Mangel, University of California, Santa Cruz, Dr. Mangel's work can also be found here

1997: Dr. David Conover, University of Oregon (formerly at SUNY, Stony Brook)