Contents
Preface
Philosophy
Admission Policies
Requirements for the Degree:
I. Time Limits for Degrees
II. Supervisory Committee
III. Required Courses
IV. Teaching Requirement
V. Program of Studies
VI. MS Prospectus
VII. PhD Proposal
VIII. Graduate Examinations
IX. Timetable
Annual Reviews
Financial Support
Registration
Miscellaneous
Appendices:
I: Residency
II: Student Travel
III: Dual Compensation
IV: English Competency
V: Graduate Appeals Policy
VI: Teaching Assistants Manual
VII: Neuroscience Program
Detailed Contents

GRADUATE HANDBOOK

Department of Biological Science

Florida State University

This is the Single page version

☞ Multi-page version

☞ PDF version

last revision approved by the faculty: 5 October 2017


TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE
PHILOSOPHY
ADMISSION POLICIES
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE
      Summary
      I. Time Limits for Degrees
      II. Supervisory Committee
      III. Required Courses
      IV. Teaching Requirement
      V. Program of Studies (MS and PhD Students)
      VI. Prospectus for the Thesis MS Degree
      VII. Proposal for the PhD Degree
      VIII. Graduate Examinations
      IX. Timetable
ANNUAL REVIEWS and SCHOLARLY ENGAGEMENT
FINANCIAL SUPPORT
REGISTRATION
MISCELLANEOUS
APPENDICES
      I: Residency
      II: Funding for Student Travel
      III: Dual Compensation
      IV: English Competency
      V: Graduate Appeals Policy
      VI: Teaching Assistants (TA) Manual
      VII: Neuroscience Doctoral Program
Detailed Table of Contents

PREFACE

This document contains information useful to both graduate students and faculty. It lists and defines requirements and responsibilities for our graduate degree programs. It also provides details on such "fringe benefits" as departmental funding of graduate research expenses and travel to present a paper at one professional meeting per year. Nevertheless, it might be incomplete, and you are invited to suggest topics to be added and/or clarified in future editions.

The degree program guidelines are designed to ensure that students progress toward earning a degree in a timely fashion.

A. Students may complete the requirements in the departmental Graduate Guide of the year in which they enter FSU or those of any subsequent year's Guide. Students may not combine requirements from different years except at the discretion of the Associate Chair (see below) and then only for sound academic reasons presented in advance. Please note that the Department may have additional, or more stringent, requirements than are stated in the FSU Graduate Bulletin. Continuing students who are unsure of their requirements should consult with the Graduate Office.

B. Students are expected to satisfy all requirements within the specified time lines, except when it is impossible to do so for reasons beyond their control. In such cases, which should be identified in advance, the Associate Chair can exercise discretionary authority either to waive the requirement or to approve an extension or substitution. The Associate Dean of Students in the College of Arts and Sciences also has discretionary authority, but only with regard to college requirements (e.g., extension of academic probation).

C. Finally, and certainly not least, we want you to know that we wish each of you every success in what will be an exciting and rewarding graduate experience, and that we are available at all times to serve in the facilitation of your career.

PHILOSOPHY

The program of graduate study in the Department of Biological Science is designed to transform an individual from student to professional scholar. Awarding of the degree signifies that the individual is qualified to join the community of scholars and is recognized as an authority in the discipline.

Graduate education is one of the most important missions of the department. Thus, effort is made to provide both financial and professional support for qualified research-based graduate students. The goal of such support is to facilitate progress toward the graduate degree while contributing to the teaching and research effort of the university. Secondarily, an additional goal of the Department is to provide course opportunities for continuing graduate scholars to assist career enhancements.

ADMISSION POLICIES

Admissions Criteria

Applicants are strongly encouraged to meet minimal criteria of a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (upper division work), a Graduate Record Exam Verbal score of 156 (72%, 550 on the old GRE) and a Quantitative score of 154 (67%, 530 on the old GRE), and 3 current letters of recommendation from individuals who are able to assess the applicant's academic and research potential. Foreign students, in addition to the above, also must score a minimum of 600 on the paper-based TOEFL exam; 250 on the computer-based TOEFL exam, or 92 on the internet-based TOEFL exam.

The Department ordinarily does not accept a student without a faculty sponsor or sponsors willing to serve as the major professor.

Admission into the PhD and MS Thesis Programs, and Switching between Programs

Students holding a bachelor's degree may apply for either the PhD or the MS Thesis program. Students enrolled in the MS program may switch to the PhD program with the approval of their Supervisory Committee and the Associate Chair. The Committee's recommendation must include a justification from the major professor and be co-signed by all the committee members.

Continuation for the PhD Degree after completing the M.S Thesis.

Students receiving a MS Thesis degree from our Department may request continuation in the PhD program by the following mechanism. The student and major professor can greatly facilitate this process by laying the ground work well before the formal request.

The Master's Supervisory Committee should be informed of the student's intent to continue for the PhD before the thesis defense by way of a cover letter accompanying the thesis. Within 2 weeks following the thesis defense, each of the Supervisory Committee members should send to the Graduate Office a statement expressing a position for or against continuation of the student in the PhD program. Within one week of receiving the last Supervisory Committee member letter, the Graduate Office will provide the available documentation to the Area and request that the Area submit a recommendation to the Associate Chair for or against continuation of the student in the PhD program. The Associate Chair will make the final decision.

A student may appeal a negative decision by the Associate Chair to the departmental Graduate Policy Committee (GPC). This appeal should be submitted, in writing, to the Graduate Office within 2 weeks following receipt of the negative decision. For the purpose of the appeal, the GPC will be convened by the Department Chair instead of the Associate Chair. The 6 voting members of the committee will be the Department Chair, faculty members on the GPC excluding the Associate Chair, and the student member of the GPC. The Associate Chair may be present for consultation but will not vote. A majority decision by the appeal committee will be final at the departmental level.

Neuroscience Doctoral Program (see Appendix VII).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE

Summary

A. Course-type Master’s Requirements

B. Master’s Requirements

C. Doctoral Requirements

I. Time Limits for Degrees

The course-type master’s program is designed to be completed in 18 months to 2 years.

A thesis master's program should be designed so that it can be completed in 2-3 years. The University requires that master’s degree be completed within 7 years from the time the student first registers for graduate credit.

A doctoral program should be more flexible than the master’s degrees. The University requires that the degree be completed within 5 calendar years from the time the student gains admittance to candidacy by passing the Preliminary Examination.

II. Supervisory Committee

A. Committee Composition
The graduate supervisory committee is responsible for guiding the student's research program and adherence to graduate policies. At least half the committee members must be tenured or tenure-earning Department of Biological Science faculty who hold Graduate Faculty Status (GFS). Masters committees cannot have more than one non-tenure track faculty member, doctoral committees cannot have more than 2 non-tenure track faculty members.

Course-type MS -- the Director of the Course-type Master’s program and the DIS research supervisor. All committee members must have GFS or co-Doctoral Directive Status (co-DDS) or co-Master's Directive Status (co-MDS). If the committee has a single major professor, this person must be a tenured or tenure-earning member of the Department of Biological Science who holds GFS, or a faculty member of FSU’s Coastal and Marine Laboratory who holds GFS. If the committee has 2 co-major professors, one of them must be a tenured or tenure-earning member of the Department of Biological Science with GFS. The committee is established by written memo to the Graduate Office from the Director of the Course-type Master’s program.

Thesis MS--major professor plus 2-3 other members. All committee members must have GFS or co-Doctoral Directive Status (co-DDS) or co -Master's Directive Status (co-MDS). MemoIf the committee has a single major professor, this person must be a tenured or tenure-earning member of the Department of Biological Science who holds GFS, or a faculty member of FSU’s Coastal and Marine Laboratory who holds GFS. If the committee has 2 co-major professors, one of them must be a tenured or tenure-earning member of the Department of Biological Science with GFS. MemoThe committee is established by written memo to the Graduate Office from the major professor and initialed by each committee member, and the committee must be approved by the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies. (See Graduate Handbook section IX. Timetable.)

PhD-- major professor plus at least 4 other members. All committee members must have GFS or co-Doctoral Directive Status (co-DDS). MemoIf the committee has a single major professor that person must be a tenured or tenure-earning member of the Department of Biological Science, or a member of FSU’s Coastal and Marine Laboratory, with GFS. If the committee has 2 co-major professors one of them must be a tenured or tenure-earning member of the Department of Biological Science with GFS. One member of the committee, the University Representative, must be a tenured FSU faculty member with GFS who is from a department other than Biological Science and who does not have a courtesy faculty appointment in Biological Science.Memo The committee is established by written memo to the Graduate Office from the major professor and initialed by each committee member, and the committee must be approved by the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies. (See Graduate Handbook section IX. Timetable.)

The Graduate Office must be notified, immediately, of any changes in the constitution of the committee (e.g., substitution of committee members or change of major professor).

B. Co-Major Professor
Tenured or tenure-earning faculty who hold GFS in other departments at Florida State University can serve as co-major professor with a tenured or tenure-earning faculty member of the Department of Biological Science who holds GFS. The remaining committee composition must be consistent with both departmental and university standards.

C. Retired Faculty
Tenured or tenure-earning faculty with GFS who retire or leave the university may continue to serve on committees under the following conditions (as approved by the Faculty Senate).

Fully retired faculty may continue to serve as major professors for those students who have already begun their dissertation at the time of the major professor's retirement. Fully retired faculty, however, may not accept additional students in this capacity. Fully retired faculty may serve as an additional member beyond the minimum number required on doctoral committees of new students if they choose

Faculty holding GFS who leave the university may continue to serve on existing committees provided they are granted a courtesy faculty appointment in Biological Science. If the departing faculty member is the student’s major professor then a co-major professor must be appointed who is a tenured or tenure-earning Biological Science faculty member with GFS.

D. Courtesy Faculty
Courtesy faculty who are not tenured or tenure-track personnel of FSU can serve on supervisory committees with the following restrictions:

They must be members of the Department of Biological Science or have a courtesy faculty appointment in Biological Science.

They must have the appropriate directive status -- GFS, or co-DDS for doctoral committees. GFS, co-DDS or co-MDS for masters committees. If they are on the faculty at another university in the SUS, then they must hold the appropriate directive status at their home university.

They may be co-major professor with a tenured or tenure-earning Biological Science faculty member who holds GFS, subject to approval of Associate Chair for Graduate Studies.

The remaining committee composition must be consistent with both departmental and university standards

Each fall students will meet with their committees to discuss their progress. Each committee will then submit to the student and to the Graduate Office a statement assessing the student's progress (see Annual Reviews).

III. Required Courses

A. Colloquium (BSC 6921)
This course is an important learning vehicle. Students should take advantage of the breadth of new information, strategies, and research-track directions of research presented by experts in various fields. Attendance is required for students and encouraged for faculty and Course-type MS students. Neuroscience students should register for the neuroscience colloquium (PSB 6920) instead of BSC 6921.

B. Seminars
Graduate education involves learning how to present research ideas and results. The degree seminar requirements contribute to this education.

Both the Thesis MS and PhD degree programs require the presentation of "departmental seminar(s)." A "departmental seminar" should consist of an oral presentation of greater than 40 minutes in length during which the student makes a professional presentation of a body of scientific information to an audience.The student's Supervisory Committee will be responsible for determining which presentations fulfill this requirement by informing the Graduate Office of the title, date, and type of forum of the approved presentation. At the discretion of the Supervisory Committee, student presentations in graded courses, selected topics courses, and area seminars (including for example Seminar in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) can satisfy this requirement. Ordinarily, journal club and research lab meeting presentations or thesis and dissertation defense presentations will not fulfill this requirement.

Course- type MS -- No departmental seminar is required.

MemoThesis MS -- One departmental seminar as defined above is required. Students also are encouraged to present their research at regional and/or national meetings.

MemoPhD -- Three presentations are required, one of which must be a departmental seminar as defined above. The other 2 presentations may be either departmental seminars or presentations at regional and/or national meetings. Oral presentations at meetings may be shorter than 40 minutes. Poster presentations count only for the senior author, and only one poster presentation can be used toward satisfying this requirement.

C. Core Courses
As required by particular areas. (Consult with your major professor.)

BSC 5900 (Directed Individual Study). A Course-type MS student must register for DIS research hours as soon as the research project has been selected and begun. A minimum of 2 semesters satisfactory DIS research is required for the Course-type MS degree.

BSC 5971 (Thesis Research). A Thesis MS student must register for thesis research as soon as the research project has been selected and begun. A minimum of 6 thesis hours is needed for graduation.

BSC 6980 (Dissertation Research). Once the Preliminary Exam has been successfully completed, a student must register for BSC 6980. A minimum of 24 dissertation hours is needed for graduation.

Such other courses as may be specified by the supervisory committee.

D. Responsible Conduct of Research
Federal funding agencies have requirements for training on the responsible conduct of research for individuals supported by or participating in projects funded by those agencies. The University Office of Research has established policy and procedures for ensuring compliance with these requirements. RegisterIn order to comply with University policy, all Biology graduate students must complete the online training course offered by CITI (Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative) within two months of first registering as a graduate student.

Students are also encouraged to register for the course "PSB 5077: Responsible Conduct of Research" as an introduction to survival skills and ethics in scientific research.

IV. Teaching Requirement

Graduate students who have not earned a minimum of 18 graduate hours should register for BSC 5945 (Supervised Teaching) for up to 3 hours total in their master's degree program or up to 5 hours total in their doctoral degree program.

A. Course-type MS -- no teaching experience is required.

B. Thesis MS -- Memoteaching experience in at least one course recommended by supervisory committee and approved by the Associate Chair.

C. PhD -- Memoteaching experience in at least 2 different courses recommended by supervisory committee and approved by the Associate Chair.

D. BSC 1005L -- may count for the teaching requirement at the discretion of the Associate Chair.

E. Teaching Workshop -- the Department offers a Teaching Workshop the week prior to fall classes. New students are required to attend. The coordinator of the workshop is Dr. Carolyn Schultz, (850) 644-6826.

V. Program of Studies (MS and PhD Students)

This document, developed in consultation with the supervisory committee, should outline past and current course work and courses proposed for the future. Form (See IX. Timetable.)

VI. Prospectus for the Thesis MS Degree

This should follow the same outline as the doctoral proposal (see below), but should be about 5 to 10 pages long. A budget is not required. The student is required to meet with the supervisory committee to discuss and defend the prospectus. MemoUpon committee approval, the prospectus is submitted to the Graduate Office.

The Prospectus must be submitted no later than the third semester in residence.

VII. Proposal for the PhD Degree

Most of our PhD students will be involved in writing grant proposals during their careers. The writing of a PhD proposal is intended to provide experience in writing a research proposal. Therefore, the proposal should follow the NSF or NIH format. Writing the proposal also helps the student crystallize the plan for their dissertation research and map out the experiments that need to be done. The proposal must be defended within 6 months of completing the Preliminary Examination and no later than the tenth semester in the program, and students must submit their proposal to their committees no less than 2 weeks prior to the proposal defense. Committees of students not meeting this schedule must submit a memo to the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies explaining why the proposal is delayed and setting a clear date for the proposal defense. A minimum of 12 months must elapse between approval of the proposal and defense of dissertation.

Generally the proposal will include the following:

A. Abstract

B. Significance

C. Introduction with background review

D. Proposed research and rationale

E. Facilities and equipment required

F. Budget (including indirect costs and "fringe benefits")

G. Time required to complete study

H. Vita

I. Literature cited

The student is required to meet with the supervisory committee to discuss and defend the proposal. MemoUpon committee approval, the proposal is submitted to the Graduate Office.

VIII. Graduate Examinations

It is often difficult to arrange an exam or defense during the summer because of the unavailability of committee members who tend to be off-campus during this time. Analogous problems might result from one or more committee members being on sabbatical for one or both semesters of the academic year. Students should check with their committee members well in advance of any such examination to make sure that everybody will be available to participate.

Theses, written exams, and dissertations are expected to reflect original work. The review of academic integrity should be completed prior to the oral defense by the major professor. Faculty may choose to use appropriate plagiarism checkers and peer review tools (such as iThenticate) with early drafts of these manuscripts as an instructional aid in advising students on matters relating to plagiarism.

A. Comprehensive Written Examination for Course-type MS
Students will have to pass a written examination to be composed and administered by the Supervisory Committee. The written examination may be tailored to the area of study and the research area. A memo will be sent to the Graduate Advising Office confirming when the student has successfully passed this exam.

B. The Thesis Defense (BSC 8976)
The Thesis Defense (BSC8976) will consist of an oral defense of the completed master's thesis as well as a test of general knowledge. FormsThe candidate must submit the final copy of the thesis to the supervisory committee at least one week before the scheduled examination.

C. The Preliminary Examination (BSC 8964) for Doctoral Students
The written portion of the Preliminary Examination should be taken no later than the seventh semester and the written and oral portion of the exam should be completed within a 3 month period. Committees of students not meeting this schedule must submit a memo to the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies explaining why the exam is delayed and setting a clear date for the exam. At the discretion of the Supervisory Committee, any portion of the exam may be retaken within 3 months if the performance was judged unsatisfactory.

This examination is "designed to test scholarly competence and knowledge and to afford the examiners the basis for constructive recommendations concerning the student's subsequent formal or informal study" (2007-2009 FSU Graduate Bulletin, p. 54).

The possible outcomes of the Preliminary Examination are:

  1. passed
  2. failed, without possibility of re-examination
  3. conditional pass, additional work to be completed
  4. re-examine

MemoResults of the Preliminary Examination must be submitted to the Graduate Office immediately following the completion of the exam.

If a conditional pass is received, the committee must stipulate, in writing, the conditions and the deadline for meeting these conditions.

A majority vote of failed will result in dismissal of the student from the doctoral program.

D. The Dissertation Defense (BSC 8985)
The Dissertation Defense (BSC 8985) for doctoral students will consist of a public seminar presenting information from the dissertation prior to an oral examination which is administered by the candidate's supervisory committee. "Academic courtesy requires that a preliminary draft of the dissertation be submitted to each member of the supervisory committee at least four weeks before the date of the oral examination" (2007-2009 FSU Graduate Bulletin, p. 54).

University policy requires that all members of the supervisory committee be present- either physically- or by a real time virtual connection -- for the dissertation defense. In the Department of Biological Science if one committee member cannot be physically present for the dissertation defense then that committee member must be present by a video conference connection. If more than one committee member cannot be present then the defense must be rescheduled or new committee members appointed.

Passage of the dissertation defense will be based on a vote of the supervisory committee. FormsThe vote is to be recorded and communicated to the Associate Chair. The Department has a long tradition of supervisory committees making decisions by consensus. Committees are encouraged to continue to work for consensus as this produces the best possible dissertation and is in the best interest of the student and the department. However if consensus (a unanimously positive vote) cannot be reached, only one negative vote is permitted regardless of committee size, and the University Representative on the committee must vote for passage. If the University representative votes no, or if there are 2 or more negative votes by the committee, then the student has not passed the dissertation defense.

IX. Timetable

Note: There are 3 semesters per calendar year, viz., fall, spring and summer.

Course-Type MS Timetable

Requirement Action Latest Deadlines
Committee Meet with committee;
Memo to Graduate Office
1st semester
Program of Studies Form Form submitted to Graduate Office. 2nd semester
Directed Individual Study requirement literature- or research- based
Comprehensive Examination



Thesis MS Timetable

Teaching and Seminar requirements, as well as Rotations and any Courses required by Area, do not have specific deadlines, and are not shown on the timetables below.

Requirement Action Latest Deadlines
Teaching Workshop Required for PIE certification 1st week, or before 1st TA assignment
Faculty Advisor
or
Preliminary Supervisory Committee
[Memo] submitted to Graduate Office. 1st semester in residence
Major Professor Memo submitted to Graduate Office 2nd semester
Committee Meet with committee;
Memo submitted to Graduate Office
2nd semester
Program of Studies Form Form submitted to Graduate Office. 2nd semester
Annual Review [Student Info update] completed online.
[Annual Review Form] completed by Major Professor, and submitted to the committee, area representative, student, and Graduate Office.
every fall semester
Master's Prospectus Approved by the Graduate Office.
Memo submitted to Graduate Office
no later than 3rd semester
Thesis Hours (6) Register for BSC 5971 Thesis Research All semesters after Prospectus approved
Defense Register for BSC 8976
Thesis Submitted to Clearance Office. Be sure to check with the Clearance Advisor in 408 WES during your drafting in order to prevent disasters at the last second.
Thesis MS Defense Forms
within 60 days following defense



PhD Timetable

Teaching and Seminar requirements, as well as Rotations and any Courses required by Area, do not have specific deadlines, and are not shown on the timetables below.

Requirement Action Latest Deadlines
Teaching Workshop Required for PIE certification 1st week, or before 1st TA assignment
Faculty Advisor
or
Preliminary Supervisory Committee
[Memo] submitted to Graduate Office. 1st semester in residence
Major Professor Memo submitted to Graduate Office
2nd semester
Committee Meet with committee;
Memo submitted to Graduate Office
3rd semester
Program of Studies Form Form submitted to Graduate Office. 3rd semester
Annual Review [Student Info update] completed online.
[Annual Review Form] completed by Major Professor, and submitted to the committee, area representative, student, and Graduate Office.
every fall semester
Preliminary Examination Register for BSC 8964
Memo submitted to Graduate Office
Written portion should be taken no later than the 7th semester and the written and oral portion of the exam should be completed within a 3 month period.
Doctoral Proposal Approved by the Graduate Office.
Memo submitted to Graduate Office
Must be defended by the 9th or 10th semester at the latest.
Should be completed within 6 months of the Prelim Exam
Dissertation Hours (24) Register for BSC 6980 Dissertation Research All semesters after Prelim Exam passed
Defense Register for BSC 8985
Dissertation Submitted to Clearance Office. Be sure to check with the Clearance Advisor in 408 WES during your drafting in order to prevent disasters at the last second.
PhD Defense Forms
within 60 days following defense, but no later than 5 calendar years from the Prelim Exam

ANNUAL REVIEWS and SCHOLARLY ENGAGEMENT REQUIREMENT

The purpose of the Scholarly Engagement requirement is to ensure that students are active participants in the scholarly community. To meet the Scholarly Engagement requirement, doctoral students should interact with faculty and peers in ways that may include enrolling in courses; attending seminars, symposia, and conferences; engaging in collaborative study and research beyond the university campus; and utilizing the library, laboratories, and other facilities provided by the University. The goal is to prepare students to be scholars who can independently acquire, evaluate, and extend knowledge, as well as develop themselves as effective communicators and disseminators of knowledge.

All students will be evaluated annually. The intent of the annual review is to assure that each student has the opportunity for scholarly engagement and continues to make timely and satisfactory progression toward completion of the degree program.

Course-type MS students
Graduate students will be evaluated annually by the program director.

Thesis MS and PhD students
All graduate students in the Department have an opportunity to present their progress each year to the faculty in their areas. Through this process the student can be aided in fulfilling the degree requirements on a timely basis. The review also encourages interaction between graduate students and faculty who otherwise may have little direct contact.

All graduate students will be informed of their status and the results of their evaluations each year. It obviously is difficult to provide an in-depth evaluation; but the major professor should meet with the student following the review for discussion.

The committee meetings should be completed between the fourth week in September and the second week of December each year and should be reasonably uniform across groups.

The mechanism should be:

All students, except those who entered in August of the current academic year, are required to meet with their committees prior to the Reviews. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL IT IS TIME TO HAVE THE REVIEWS TO HAVE THESE MEETINGS. Faculty serve on many committees and their schedules will not permit them to accommodate last minute or spur of the moment scheduling. Those doctoral students who have passed the Preliminary Examination are required by the University to have an annual committee-signed statement (the Graduate Advising Office maintains the Annual Evaluation Forms) in their permanent University file. The Graduate Office will provide this form. It is the student's responsibility to see that the completed form is submitted to the Graduate Office.

Each student fills out a progress report plus a 250 word abstract and submits them to the Graduate Office. These will be distributed to the faculty.

Each student beyond the first year is required to present a 5-10 minute summary of his/her progress, outlining goals and presenting plans for the following year. The student's presentation should be informal, without slides, overheads or handouts. All first-year students must appear, but should merely be prepared to discuss their goals. There will be an additional 5 minutes for questions and another 5 minutes for discussion after the student leaves.

Review Outcomes
Thesis MS and PhD Students receiving a satisfactory review will be guaranteed support for the next academic year.

Any student who receives an unsatisfactory rating by the area faculty will be on probation and must meet specific conditions to continue support. When submitting an "unsatisfactory" rating for a student, the area faculty should enumerate specific criteria by which the student can achieve "satisfactory" status (e.g., get off academic probation, meet specified levels of performance in the research lab, etc.) along with a required timeline for meeting these criteria and consequences of not meeting them (loss of Department support or dismissal from the program). These recommendations will be submitted to the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies who will monitor the student’s compliance.

Each area representative will notify the Graduate Office of the results of the Reviews. Shortly after the Reviews, each student should receive from the area representative written results of the evaluation, and if necessary, any specific recommendations.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Thesis MS and PhD Students Only

Teaching Assistantships

One source of financial support for Thesis MS and PhD students is through Graduate Teaching Assistantships. For 2015-2016 the stipend is $21,239 for thesis master's students and $22,143 for doctoral students. This is considered a one-half time appointment. As a one-half time appointee, the University guidelines recommend that no more than 20 hours of duties be required of the student weekly, although this may vary depending on the needs of the department. No departmental financial support is available for students enrolled in the Course-type MS program.

Graduate Teaching Assistantships for students already enrolled are awarded and are distributed to students based on (a) an assessment of the student's progress toward the degree as primarily indicated by the Annual Review, (b) the recommendation of the faculty associated with the various courses and the student's past performance as a teaching assistant, if available. Incoming students will usually be awarded teaching assistantships as recommended by the area faculty based on the available information.

Research Assistantships

One source of financial support for Thesis MS and PhD students is the research assistantship paid for by the grant funds of the major professor. These assistantships are awarded at the discretion of the major professor subject only to the University stipulation that reinstated students on academic probation are ineligible for financial support.

Financial support varies with the resources of the major professor but should not be lower than the teaching assistantship for equivalent half-time work.

Fellowships

Florida State University provides financial support in the form of fellowships to a number of graduate students. For more information on these awards, please visit the Graduate School’s page on fellowships.

The Department of Biological Science also offers several undergraduate and graduate scholarships. For more information on these scholarships, please visit the Department's scholarships page

Tuition Waiver Policies For Research-Based Programs

University policy limits the number of years a graduate assistant can receive tuition waiver support from the University central waiver pool. The standard is 3 years for a MS degree and 3 additional years for a PhD, or a combined total of 6 years for a student who enters graduate school at FSU without a MS degree. Students who enter our graduate program with a MS degree will have a limit of 4 years for waiver support as a doctoral student except when ‘required by a departmental committee to follow the same program as a student entering without a MS degree’ in which case they fall under the same 6 year standard as students entering without a MS degree. Students who have carried a heavy instructional load throughout their graduate study may be approved for an additional year of waiver support on a case by case basis. Students enrolled in the Course-type MS program are not available to receive a tuition waiver.

A. Matriculation Waivers:
Students receiving teaching or research assistantships for at least one-quarter time or who are on a fellowship are eligible for matriculation waivers. These provide for a waiver of the in-state tuition fees only. Students are still responsible for activity, athletic, health fees, etc. Consult the Graduate Office for the necessary paperwork.

B. Out-of-State Tuition Waivers:
Students receiving teaching or research assistantships for at least one-quarter time or who are on a fellowship are eligible for out-of-state tuition waivers. These provide for a waiver of the out-of-state tuition fees only. Students are still responsible for activity, athletic, health fees, etc. Consult the Graduate Office for the necessary paperwork. U.S. citizens who are non-Florida residents are eligible for an out-of-state waiver for one year. See Appendix I for further information on residency.

Taxes on Stipends

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has ruled that student assistantships are not tax exempt. However, some foreign countries have treaties with the U.S., and individuals from those countries may be tax-exempt. Questions about taxes (especially prior returns) should be directed to the IRS.

REGISTRATION

All Thesis MS and PhD students, whether funded or not, are required to register for 12 hours each term, including summer. Students in the Course-type MS program may be enrolled part-time with the approval of the Program Director.

Exceptions

1. Completion of Program Requirements

Students who have completed all program requirements (including research) except for the thesis/dissertation writing and defense, and who have missed the final University graduation deadline at the end of the semester, must register for 2 hours (non-US residents one hour) of BSC 5971 (Thesis Research) or BSC 6980 (Dissertation Research) in the next semester in order to complete their degree. This will be allowed with the following stipulations:

A. the student will not be eligible for departmental or university support.

B. the student is not to be using University facilities (laboratory, office space, library, etc.) or personnel except those that are directly required for the student to complete the writing and defense of her/his thesis or dissertation.

C. submit to the Graduate Office a timely, supervisory committee-signed memo of approval for such absence (your major professor and other committee members must be aware that your research has indeed been completed and give approval for such absence).

Students who have not completed their degree and who leave campus to take a position elsewhere must register for 2 hours (non-US residents one hour) of BSC 5971 (Thesis Research) or BSC 6980 (Dissertation Research) each semester until graduation in order to remain in the graduate program.

2. Off-Campus Scholarly Endeavors

Students may request permission to participate in research or collaborative study beyond the university campus for a maximum of one term per academic year. The request must be approved by the student’s major professor, the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies, and the Department Chair. The student is not required to enroll at the University or register for university courses during this off-campus term. The student will not be given a departmental appointment, and the student should not utilize faculty time, laboratories, and other facilities provided by the University during this off-campus term. There will be no change in the total number of hours required for the degree. Students must still comply with the Graduate School’s continuous enrollment policy (see the FSU Graduate Bulletin, Academic Regulations and Procedures, Continuous Enrollment).

Students conducting off-campus research beyond one semester, and not using University facilities (laboratory, office space, library) or personnel:

A. will not be eligible for departmental or university support.

B. must submit to the Graduate Office a timely, supervisory committee-signed memo of approval for such absence(s).

C. must register for at least 2 hours (non-US residents one hour) of either BSC 5971 (Thesis Research) or BSC 6980 (Dissertation Research), as appropriate, each semester thus absent. Those PhD students who have not passed their Preliminary Examination should register for BSC 5900 (DIS) instead of BSC 6980. However, such absence(s) should not delay the Preliminary Examination.

In rare instances, students in their final year who are off campus conducting research and who need to use University facilities and personnel on only a limited basis, will be required to register for 4 thesis/dissertation research hours for each semester, except the final term which will be full-time hours.

3. Leave of Absence for Medical or Family Issues

Under extraordinary circumstances, students may request permission to take a one-term leave of absence for medical or family reasons. The request must be approved by the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and the Department Chair. The student is not required to enroll at the University or register for university courses during this off-campus term. The student will not be given a departmental appointment, and the student should not utilize faculty time, laboratories, and other facilities provided by the University during this off-campus term. There will be no change in the total number of hours required for the degree. Students must still comply with the Graduate School’s continuous enrollment policy (see the FSU Graduate Bulletin, Academic Regulations and Procedures, Continuous Enrollment).

MISCELLANEOUS

Research Product. Graduate students are not permitted to have undergraduates or graduates conduct any part of their thesis/dissertation research for them; but DIS students can work with a graduate student on a non-thesis/dissertation project as long as there is significant interaction with the major professor/faculty member.

Satisfying Requirements. Major professors and supervisory committees can recommend by memo to the Graduate Office that a student has satisfied a particular requirement (e.g., teaching), but are not authorized to determine that the requirement has been satisfied or waived, or to postpone a deadline. Be aware, however, that supervisory committees may impose additional requirements.

Thesis/Dissertation Format. These documents maybe written as a single work or as several individual chapters intended to be independent manuscripts. The Graduate School requires that in the latter case the thesis/dissertation must include an overall Introduction and an overall Conclusions section. Clearance guidelines can be found at the Graduate School's website on manuscript clearance. The Clearance Advisor is located in 408 Westcott.

Academic Probation MS Thesis and PhD Students on initial probation (first semester of probation) have one semester to bring their cumulative GPA up to 3.0, during which they are eligible for stipend support. Students enrolled in the Course-type MS program are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0. If the student does not reach a cumulative 3.0 by the end of that term, he/she will be dismissed from the University. Reinstatement is possible in cases in which a cumulative GPA of 3.0 is very likely by the end of the next semester. The University does not allow reinstated students to draw a stipend.

Departmental/University Facilities. The Department/University maintains an Analytical Laboratory (Dano Fiore), Electron Microscope facility (Ken Taylor), Marine Lab (Felicia Coleman), Molecular and Hybridoma Laboratory (Ken Roux), Neuroscience facilities (Mike Meredith), Computer Lab (Alex Stuy), and photo darkroom. Some of the equipment is cost-free, but some is not. Students should consult first with the major professor and then with the contact person named above concerning the use of these facilities.

Marine Lab. Students using the Marine Lab for any part of their thesis or dissertation research should supply the Marine Lab with a bound copy of the final document. The Department will cover the costs of copying and binding this copy.

APPENDIX I: Residency

Deadline for Applying for Florida Residency: The Declaration of Domicile form must be filed at the courthouse prior to the first day of classes of the term you are first registering as a graduate student. Failure to do so may jeopardize your petition for future residency.

All non-Florida, U.S. citizens are required to obtain residency by the beginning of their second year. Students must be completely independent from their parents (i.e., not claimed on tax returns, etc.) for one year prior to obtaining Florida residency status. Out-of-state tuition waivers will only be given for the first year. The Office of Graduate Studies has provided the following helpful tips: New Student Info.

APPENDIX II: Funding for Student Travel

When resources are available, the Department will assist you in attending national/regional meetings to present a paper or poster. The policies and procedures for this support are as follows:

Policies:

Every Thesis MS and PhD student is eligible to receive funds to present his/her work at one meeting each fiscal year (July-June).

You must be a registered full-time graduate student presenting (not just co-author) a paper, based on work done at Florida State University, at a national/regional meeting. International meetings will be handled separately.

The Department will provide a fixed amount of money based on the following mileage table. The figures are based on radius of travel from Tallahassee to the meeting site. No vicinity mileage is included. You will be reimbursed up to the amount which can legally be reimbursed under the State of Florida's travel procedures.

Procedures:

At least 2 weeks prior to your departure, submit to the Biology Graduate Office a notice of acceptance of your paper and evidence that you will be the presenter (i.e., abstract) along with the Funded Travel Authorization form ). The Congress of Graduate Students (COGS) may also have available funds. For information on funds from COGS, please visit the COGS website.

Upon your return you must immediately fill out a Reimbursement Voucher. Failure to do so within the first week of your return will result in NO reimbursement.

The maximum amount that any one person can receive is $800.00.

We are aware that this policy is less than perfect as it is implemented, please feel free to provide rational input, in writing, concerning any problems which arise.

TRAVEL DISTANCE
(ROUND TRIP)
AMOUNT ALLOWED
200-500 $260
501-800 $310
801-1100 $415
1101-1400 $470
1401-1700 $525
1700-2000 $580
2001-2300 $635
2301-2600 $690
2601-2900 $745
2900- $800

modified Fall 2004

APPENDIX III: Dual Compensation

The stipend provided to graduate students is intended to facilitate study, educational progress and research. Additional, unrelated, outside employment reduces a student's role in contributing to the departmental graduate program, and also might be construed as indicative of a lack of commitment to a student's training.

However, it is recognized that special, extenuating circumstances occur, and provisions for them are given in the following categorization:

FormHalf-time (or less) graduate teaching assistants (TAs) and graduate research assistants (departmental or grant RAs). Such a student finding it necessary to obtain supplementary, outside employment must report their intention to seek outside employment to his/her major professor, other supervisory committee members and the Associate Chair (see below).

FormGraduate fellowship recipients (domestic and foreign). Some fellowships include funds for payment of all fees, others pay some but not all fees, and some pay no fees. It is the Department's policy to provide students a supplemental equivalent to the fee waivers available to TAs and RAs. A copy of the award letter indicating the distribution of monies will be needed to determine eligibility for supplemental funds. Nevertheless, any fellowship recipient finding it necessary to obtain supplementary, outside employment must report their intention to seek outside employment to his/her major professor, other supervisory committee members and the Associate Chair (see below).

Greater than half-time TAs and RAs. On rare occasions it is necessary to appoint a few graduate assistants, usually on a term-by-term basis, at a level and corresponding stipend greater than half-time. Such appointments require the written approval of the initial advisor or major professor, and Associate Chair.

Graduate studies should be engaged as a full-time endeavor. Students who are supported on a qualifying assistantship are expected to be fully engaged with their studies. Additional employment or activity, especially outside the Department, is discouraged to ensure timely completion of one’s degree. Requests for additional or outside employment or activity will be evaluated for conflicts of interest in accordance with the GAU Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA).

Approval of supplemental work and compensation does not excuse a student from meeting the time lines specified in section IX. Timetable of the Graduate Guide.

APPENDIX IV: English Competency

Certification of competency in spoken English of international graduate teaching assistants, Department of Biological Science. Revised February, 2008

The Department accepts responsibility for ensuring that international students receiving departmental financial support achieve competency in spoken English sufficient to communicate as a scientist and to participate in a quality instructional program at the undergraduate level. As the minimum, the Department requires the following training/certification of all international students on entry into the graduate program.

All new Thesis MS and PhD students, including international students, are required to attend one complete orientation and departmental Teaching Workshop offered prior to the fall semester each year. It is expected that the students will take the workshop at the start of their first year in the program. Students who have not completed the workshop will not be permitted to teach.

The Department recognizes a score of 50 on the SPEAK test (or a score of 26 on the spoken part of the IBTOEFL) as certifying spoken English competency for international teaching assistants. The SPEAK test (administered by the Center for Intensive English Studies) is to be taken by all international students from countries where English is not the native language when they first arrive on campus (normally in the week before classes in the Fall semester). International students will have one calendar year from the time they enter the program to pass the Speak Test with a score of 50 or better. Any international students who fail to meet this requirement will be ineligible for support as a TA until they pass the Speak Test. Petitions for exceptions to this policy will be decided by the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies in consultation with the Graduate Policy Committee.

International students who have not passed the Speak test or who have not been certified by the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies will be required to take one credit hour of spoken English courses from C.I.E.S. every semester until they pass or are certified. (Either EAP 4830 -- "Spoken English for International TAs", EAP 4831- Advanced Spoken English for ITAs, or EAP 4832 – "Pronunciation for ITAs")

Satisfactory completion of these requirements qualifies the student to serve as a graduate teaching assistant. Assignment of teaching duties prior to completion of these requirements is at the discretion of the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies.

APPENDIX V: Graduate Appeals Policy

Grade appeals: see 2007-2009 FSU Graduate Bulletin, p63.

Other: Any graduate student who feels that an action or decision affecting him/her adversely in his/her graduate program has been made in an arbitrary and capricious manner.

A. should, within 5 calendar days of the action/decision, consult with the person(s) deemed responsible for that action/decision in order to resolve the problem.

B. should then, in the absence of a satisfactory resolution (a), consult with the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies about the matter within 5 calendar days of that meeting, and, if the issue is still not resolved.

C. can file a dated 1-page appeal document with the Graduate Office within the next 5 calendar days.

The written appeal document must contain.

A. a description of the action or decision, with citation of the date(s) when made and by whom, and

B. a statement of the resolution sought, with a justification of that remedy.

The appeal document will be duplicated and distributed to the departmental Graduate Policy Committee (= 4 faculty representatives + one student representative + Associate Chair), which may arrange a meeting with the student to explore the problem. The meeting will be held within 5 calendar days of receipt of the appeal document.

The Graduate Policy Committee will reach a decision within 5 calendar days of the meeting, with the Associate Chair voting only to resolve a tie. No committee member with possible conflict of interest will participate in the proceedings except for a possible interview by the rest of the Committee. The student will be sent a written decision immediately.

A student who is dissatisfied with the decision of the Graduate Policy Committee may appeal that decision to the departmental chairperson within 5 calendar days of receipt of the committee decision. The Department Chair will consult the original appeal document and may meet with the student (and perhaps committee members) within 5 calendar days and shall notify the student of his decision in writing within 5 calendar days. This decision will be binding.

A student's non-adherence to the time lines stated herein will lead to dismissal of the appeal unless extenuating circumstances apply. Committee member absences might cause some time limitation(s) to be extended.

Discretion and confidentiality will be exercised during the entire appeals process. A student will not suffer a punitive action or decision for having pursued an appeal.

APPENDIX VI: Teaching Assistants (TA) Manual

The opportunity to teach is one of the great joys of academic life. Nothing is more rewarding than being able to share your knowledge with others and help them grow in knowledge and skills. As a teaching assistant you are part of the university’s instructional staff, all of whom must work together to provide a coherent and high quality educational program for our undergraduates. The purpose of this manual is to outline the Department’s policies and guidelines for teaching assistants, and to provide logistical information that TAs need, so that the delivery of our undergraduate courses is orderly and effective. This is not intended to be a manual on how to teach. Some teaching training is provided is the Department’s annual Teaching Workshop, which is required to be taken by all new graduate students and undergraduate TAs. Additional training for teachers is available through the Teaching Enhancement Workshops of the Program in Instructional Excellence.

Admission, Support, and Category Changes

Only in exceptional cases is an unfunded student admitted to a Thesis MS or PhD graduate program in the department. Most Thesis MS and PhD students receive an initial appointment as a TA; later many students are supported with research grants as a RA. A few students switch back and forth, depending on the availability of grant funds. TAs planning to be supported by an available RAship must provide the departmental Graduate Office with a "timely notification of intent" in order to avoid depleting the teaching personnel needed by the department.

Selection of Graduate Assistants

The awarding of teaching and research assistantships is decided at the time graduate students are considered for admission. Assistantships are awarded at the request of individual faculty members with the approval from the area faculty (Cell & Molecular Biology, Neuroscience, and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology) and the Associate Chair.

Continuing students may be reappointed on a departmental TA/RAship for the ensuing academic year if (1) so recommended by the area faculty following the Annual Review (see departmental Graduate Guide: Annual Reviews ) and approved by the Associate Chair and (2) funds are available.

Initial and continued appointment on a grant RAship is at the discretion of the principal investigator.

TA Course Assignment(s)

Teaching assignments are made by the Office of the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies. New TAs are customarily assigned to BSC 1005L, BSC 2010L, or BSC 2011L unless a particular student has the background to fill a special need in another course. Subsequent assignments are made to other courses when possible, with veteran students having priority. The primary considerations in making TA assignments are the teaching needs of the Department and the expertise and dependability of the individual graduate students. However, the wishes of the faculty and graduate students are also taken into account. Prior to the beginning of each semester the Graduate Office asks the graduate students which courses they would prefer to be assigned; the faculty are also asked which students they want as their TAs. Recommendations from supervisory committees are also taken into account. Every effort is made to accommodate all parties, but fluctuations in course enrollments and course offerings do not always provide that everyone can be accommodated. Assignments are made on a one-semester-at-a-time basis.

Teaching Workshop

All new Thesis MS and PhD students, and all undergraduate students who are teaching for the first time, are required to attend the Department’s Teaching Workshop. This week-long workshop is held during the week before classes each Fall semester and is coordinated by Dr. Carolyn Schultz, (850) 644-6826. The workshop provides instruction in teaching and gives critical information on University and departmental teaching policies. Under exceptional circumstances the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies may approve a student’s petition to delay taking the Teaching Workshop; however no exceptions are made to the requirement that all new graduate students and undergraduate TA take this workshop. Both Graduate and Undergraduate TAs are compensated for the time they spend at the workshop.

Duties and Responsibilities

There are varying workloads for different levels of appointment (viz., 1/4-, 1/3-, 1/2-time, etc.,). These apply to both TAs and RAs. The standard TA assignment is ½-time (which nominally means 20 hr/week). Most TAs are assigned responsibility for teaching in laboratory courses, but some TAs serve to help organize and prepare materials for large laboratory courses such as BSC 2010L (course “Honchos”), and some TAs are assigned to assist a faculty member who is teaching a large lecture course (usually the TA helps with grading and by running review/help sessions). Some opportunity for lecturing experience (under faculty supervision) is available during the summer, particularly in BSC 1005.

The standard TA assignment is responsibility for teaching 2 sections of a laboratory course that meets once a week for 3 hours. However, some courses differ in format (some lab classes meet once a week for 2 hours and some have two 3-hour class meetings each week), so TA assignments are balanced to keep the work load approximately the same for all TAs.

Specific TA duties, both in and out of class, are defined by the faculty member in charge of the course (course instructor), or by the staff member responsible for a large laboratory course (the course coordinator). Unsatisfactory performance by a TA/RA may result in forfeiture of the assistantship. In general, a TA is expected to work on course-related activities for an average of 20 hours per week, although some weeks may require more time and some less. Each TA is expected to be on campus and available to work starting one week before classes and to remain until course grades are submitted on the Tuesday after Final Exam Week or until the course instructor/coordinator indicates the TA may leave. If a TA needs to be out of town, or for other reasons cannot fulfill their teaching duties for a period of time (for example to attend a conference or because of a family emergency), then it is the TAs responsibility to inform the course instructor/coordinator as early as possible and to work with the instructor/coordinator to find a suitable replacement. The TA must also fill out the Attendance Policy for Teaching Assistants Form and submit it to the Graduate Office in advance of their trip. This requirement includes times when 2 TAs in the same course swap sections. The Department is committed to being flexible and making it possible for TAs to attend meetings and other educational programs, but the TA must realize that not all accommodations are possible. In general TAs should not expect to be able to be away from their teaching duties more than once a semester and not for more than one week at a time.

Attendance Policy for Teaching Assistants Form: (obtain here)

Emergency Situations

Any TA that finds they are unable to attend a class or get to class on time must immediately contact the faculty member in charge of the course (course instructor), or the course coordinator, so that arrangements can be made to cover the class. If the instructor/coordinator cannot be reached, then the TA should contact the departmental office (850-644-3700) and inform the office staff of their absence.

If during class a student becomes ill and needs medical assistance the TA should contact the University Police (850-644-1234) and should also inform the course instructor/coordinator of the situation. If a student becomes unmanageable and disruptive in class the TA should calmly direct the student to leave the classroom, and if the student refuses to leave then the TA should contact the University Police and have the student removed from the classroom. Such incidents should also be reported to the course instructor/coordinator.

Violations of the University’s Academic Honor Code (Cheating)

The Florida State University Academic Honor Policy defines the University’s expectations of students in terms of academic honesty and lays out the procedures that are to be followed in cases of academic dishonesty. The Academic Honor Policy is found in the FSU General Bulletin, this policy was substantially revised effective Fall semester 2005. All students and faculty are expected to be familiar with and abide by this Academic Honor Policy.

As described in the Academic Honor Code, academic dishonesty includes (but is not necessarily limited to) plagiarism (intentional copying another’s work without proper citation), cheating on exams or quizzes, unauthorized group work, fabrication or falsification of data, multiple submission of papers or reports, damaging or stealing academic materials, and complicity in academic dishonesty (one student knowingly letting another student copy from their exam).

As a TA, if you observe academic dishonesty by a student in a class under your supervision you are required to follow up on it. The first thing to do is to collect and preserve the evidence. The next step is to confer with the course instructor/coordinator, explain what happened and what evidence you have. The course instructor/coordinator will help you determine if academic dishonesty has occurred and will help you work through resolving it following the procedures laid out in the Academic Honor Policy. It is important to know that the TAs role in resolving a potential case of academic dishonesty is not done when he/she has reported the incident to the course instructor/coordinator. Since you as the TA were the primary witness of the incident you will be needed throughout the process of resolving the issues.

Departmental Policies on Interpersonal Relationships between TAs and Students and the University Policy on Sexual Harassment.

It is the policy of the Department that there should be no close interpersonal relationship between a TA and a student in the section(s) of the course they are teaching. You not only must not date your students, but you should not have as a student a relative or in-law or someone with whom you formerly had a close interpersonal relationship. If you find you are assigned to a class in which there is a student with whom you have a relationship, you should inform the course instructor/coordinator and discuss what changes could be made to resolve the problem. The purpose of this policy is to make sure that all students in a class have, and feel they have, fair and equal treatment by their TA.

The University has a very explicit policy regarding sexual harassment and how sexual harassment should be handled. In part the University defines sexual harassment as: “unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature directed at an employee or student by another …” It is the responsibility of each TA to read and be familiar with the University’s sexual harassment policy (see the Office of Human Resources website ). One particularly important aspect of this policy that pertains to TAs is its reporting requirement. Under the University’s policy any supervisor who has witnessed or becomes aware of an alleged occurrence of sexual harassment by, or who receives a complaint of sexual harassment involving a person within their purview is required to report the matter to the University’s Office of Audit Services. As a TA, all the students in the sections you are teaching are under your "purview", you are their supervisor in this context. If you think sexual harassment is occurring in your class, or if sexual harassment is reported to you by one of your students, you should immediately discuss the matter with the students involved and with the course instructor/coordinator; if it appears that sexual harassment has occurred then the course instructor/coordinator will be obliged to report it to the University Auditor.

APPENDIX VII: Neuroscience Doctoral Program

The interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience includes faculty in several departments, primarily Biological Science and Psychology. Graduate students in the Department of Biological Science who are working with members of the Program in Neuroscience may elect to work toward the PhD in Neuroscience rather than the PhD in Biological Science. This program has additional requirements, offers opportunities for specialized training and a degree reflecting the specialization. Biological Science based Neuroscience PhD students remain graduate students in the Department of Biological Science and must meet all departmental requirements. In return, they remain eligible for all departmental benefits including TA appointments and travel funds. Courses required for all Neuroscience PhD students are PCB 5845: Cell and Molecular Neuroscience, PSB 5341: Systems and Behavioral Neuroscience, PSB 5057: Molecules to Behavior, and PSB 5077: Responsible Conduct of Research. The supervisory committee must include a minimum of 3 members of the graduate faculty who have doctoral directive status, one of whom is a representative-at-large of the graduate faculty drawn from outside the student's department and degree program. Neuroscience students should include a Neuroscience Program member from a department other than their home department and a non-Neuroscience Program member from their home department.

Prospective Neuroscience graduate students may enter the Neuroscience PhD degree track directly. Because there is no MS in Neuroscience, students wishing to achieve a Thesis MS degree before proceeding to the PhD may be admitted as a regular Biological Science student but are recognized within the Neuroscience Program and the Department as Neuroscience students.

A description of the Program in Neuroscience is found at the http://www.neuro.fsu.edu. The Program maintains several general-use facilities with associated professional staff in the department, including: BRF Computer Facility (Jason Orman); Photo lab (Charles Badland); Histology facility (XiXi Jia).

DETAILED TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE

PHILOSOPHY

ADMISSION POLICIES
      Admissions Criteria
      Admission into the PhD and MS Thesis Programs
      Continuation for the PhD Degree after completing the M.S Thesis.
      Neuroscience Doctoral Program

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE

Summary
      A. Course-type Master’s Requirements
      B. Master’s Requirements
      C. Doctoral Requirements

I. Time Limits for Degrees

II. Supervisory Committee
      A. Committee Composition
      B. Co-Major Professor
      C. Retired Faculty
      D. Courtesy Faculty

III. Required Courses
      A. Colloquium (BSC 6921)
      B. Seminars
      C. Core Courses
      D. Responsible Conduct of Research

IV. Teaching Requirement
      A. Course-type MS
      B. Thesis MS
      C. PhD
      D. BSC 1005L
      E. Teaching Workshop

V. Program of Studies (MS and PhD Students)

VI. Prospectus for the Thesis MS Degree

VII. Proposal for the PhD Degree

VIII. Graduate Examinations
      A. Comprehensive Written Examination for Course-type MS
      B. The Thesis Defense (BSC 8976)
      C. The Preliminary Examination (BSC 8964) for Doctoral Students
      D. The Dissertation Defense (BSC 8985) for doctoral students

IX. Timetable
      Course-type MS Timetable
      Thesis MS Timetable
      Phd Timetable

ANNUAL REVIEWS and SCHOLARLY ENGAGEMENT
      Course-type MS students
      Thesis MS and PhD students
      Review Outcomes

FINANCIAL SUPPORT (Thesis MS and PhD Students Only)
      Teaching Assistantships
      Research Assistantships
      Fellowships
      Tuition Waiver Policies For Research-Based Programs
            A. Matriculation Waivers
            B. Out-of-State Tuition Waivers
      Taxes on Stipends

REGISTRATION
      Exceptions
      Completion of Requirements
      Off-Campus Research
      Medical/Family Leave

MISCELLANEOUS
      Research Product
      Satisfying Requirements
      Thesis/Dissertation Format
      Academic Probation
      Departmental/University Facilities
      Marine Lab

APPENDIX I: Residency

APPENDIX II: Funding for Student Travel
      Policies
      Procedures

APPENDIX III: Dual Compensation

APPENDIX IV: English Competency

APPENDIX V: Graduate Appeals Policy

APPENDIX VI: Teaching Assistants (TA) Manual
      Admission, Support, and Category Changes
      Selection of Graduate Assistants
      TA Course Assignment(s)
      Teaching Workshop
      Duties and Responsibilities
      Attendance Policy for Teaching Assistants Form:
      Emergency Situations
      Violations of the University’s Academic Honor Code (Cheating)
      Departmental Policies on Interpersonal Relationships between TAs and Students and the University Policy on Sexual Harassment

APPENDIX VII: Neuroscience Doctoral Program