Ecology & Evolution

Faculty

Sandra D. Brooke

My primary research is on coral reefs from shallow waters to the deep sea. My focus is on understanding their distribution, abundance, and physiology, as well as how they are affected by anthropogenic impacts.


Scott Burgess

RM #4021
King Life Sciences

My research combines ecological and evolutionary principles to study the population biology of coastal marine invertebrates. Topics studied include larval dispersal, population connectivity, population dynamics, life history evolution, adaptive phenotypic plasticity, maternal effects, and local adaptation. I typically use some combination of field and laboratory experiments, field surveys, and mathematical modeling.


Felicia C. Coleman

Director, FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory
Pew Marine Conservation Fellow, 2001

RM #2006
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 1259


Chip Cotton

My research is broadly applied to studies of life history and ecology for a variety of fishes. Since some of the species I study are rare or poorly described, several taxonomic investigations have naturally co-evolved with this work. Much of my recent research is focused on deep-water species collected from Desoto Canyon, the site of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. I am also very interested in estuarine and marine fishes important to the ecology and economy of the Gulf of Mexico (e.g. groupers, drums, and coastal elasmobranchs).


Kevin Dixon

Teaching Faculty

RM #3020
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

  • Ph:(850) 645-8813
  • dixon@bio.fsu.edu
  • Cannot mentor graduate students in the Dept of Biological Science.

Geographic variation in sexual selection.


Emily H. DuVal

Associate Professor

RM #4078
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

  • Laboratory Home Page
  • Ph:(850) 644-2467
  • Can mentor graduate students in the Dept of Biological Science.

My lab group investigates the social behavior of wild birds. We study how social groups form, the selective forces that influence cooperation, and the fitness effects of complex behaviors. Our work analyzes detailed long-term field data on behavior and genetic reproductive success, using statistical models to quantify within- and between-individual effects. Major study systems include Lance-tailed Manakins in Panama and Brown-headed Nuthatches in the Tallahassee area.


Gregory M. Erickson

Professor of Anatomy and Vertebrate Paleobiology
Curator, Florida State University Biological Science Museum

RM #4011
King Life Sciences


Dean Grubbs

RM #121
Admin Building

My research interests are in ichthyology and marine ecology with an emphasis on the biology of coastal, pelagic, and deep sea fishes. Much of my research focuses on exploited, imperiled, or poorly studied elasmobranch species and is often directed towards answering questions necessary for sustainable management and conservation of their populations. I am particularly interested in the drivers of community structure and habitat use patterns as well as population dynamics and life history variability.


David Houle

Professor

RM #4063
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

  • Personal Home Page
  • Ph:(850) 645-0388
  • Can mentor graduate students in the Dept of Biological Science.

I am an evolutionary geneticist, studying the relationship between genomic and phenotypic variation. Now that we have genomes, we need a comparably thorough understanding of phenomes to understand the selection that acts on genetic variation. Our models are the appendages of fruit flies, where we exploit genomic variation, direct manipulation of genes and experimental evolution to understand how the developmental system shapes variation, and ultimately the ability of complex systems to evolve.


Kimberly A. Hughes

Professor

RM #4062
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

  • Laboratory Home Page
  • Ph:(850) 645-8553
  • Can mentor graduate students in the Dept of Biological Science.

Why are organisms are so genetically diverse? This is the broad question on which my lab focuses. In particular, we want to understand how variation is maintained in traits that are under strong natural selection: life history traits, sexually selected traits, and other traits closely tied to fitness. We use a variety of approaches to investigate these issues ranging from field experiments to genomic analyses.


Brian D. Inouye

Professor

RM #4010
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

My current research projects include (1) competition-coexistence trade-offs in a tropical ant-plant system, (2) experiments on effects of resource heterogeneity for host-parasitoid interactions, (3) effects of environmental and demographic variation on the spatial spread of invasive species, (4) collaborative work with Nora Underwood on the spatial ecology of plant-herbivore interactions, (5) the community ecology of cynipid gall-wasps on oak trees and their parasitoids.


Kathryn M. Jones

Associate Professor

RM #230A
Biology Unit I
Mailcode: 4370

  • Ph:(850) 645-8743
  • kmjones@bio.fsu.edu
  • Can mentor graduate students in the Dept of Biological Science.

I am interested in the symbiotic interaction between nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria and legume host plants, including: 1) How bacteria manipulate their environment during host plant invasion in such a way that the plant not only permits entry, but provides an invasion pathway for them; 2) Why the interactions of specific strains of Sinorhizobium with particular Medicago truncatula plant ecotypes are more productive than others; 3) How host plants direct resources to productive symbionts at the expense of unproductive symbionts (cheaters).


Emily C. Lemmon

Associate Professor

RM #213
Biomedical Research Facility
Mailcode: 4340

Research in our lab focuses on the study of speciation, from the earliest stages where populations start to diverge to the final stages where reproductive isolation evolves. We are also involved in accelerating resolution of the Tree of Life, through development of next-generation sequencing approaches for phylogenomics.


Don R. Levitan

Chairman and Professor

RM #2067
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

I am interested in the ecology and evolution of marine invertebrates. My work examines the interactions between ecological processes, natural and sexual selection, and molecular evolution. I am particularly interested in how sperm availability and population density influence the evolution of gamete traits and reproductive behavior and the cascading effects of this selection on reproductive isolation and speciation. I enjoy integrating field experiments and molecular studies with theory.


Leithen M'Gonigle

RM #4019
King Life Sciences

I aim to understand how interactions between species 1) enable those species to persist and 2) direct their evolution. I use a combination of theoretical, empirical, and statistical approaches. Topics I am most interested in include sexual selection, host-parasite interactions, and Allee effects. In my theoretical work, I also aim to generate empirically testable hypotheses and to make connections with conservation programs.


Austin R. Mast

Professor

RM #4065
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

My research program involves topics within the broadly defined area of biodiversity study. I am particularly interested in (1) the interplay of ecology and evolution that determines the form and function of plant life on Earth and (2) the use of biodiversity research specimens and digital information about them to bring that interplay into sharper focus.


Sophie J. McCoy

Assistant Professor

RM #4060
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

  • McCoy Lab Page
  • Ph:(850) 644-1549
  • Can mentor graduate students in the Dept of Biological Science.

I am a community ecologist with broad interests in ecology, evolution, physiology, and environmental chemistry. My research focuses on macroalgal populations, intertidal communities, and links between biology, environmental conditions and water chemistry. I use a combination of field and laboratory methods to understand natural variability in marine populations, responses of species and communities to climate change and pollution.


Thomas E. Miller

Professor

RM #4022
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

I am broadly interested in what controls the diversity and abundance of species in different communities and I work in two very different areas. (1) Coastal Dune Vegetation: I am interested in the forces that structure communities on barrier islands, with an eye to understanding long-term effects of climate change. (2) Evolution of Protozoa in Pitcher Plants: We use models and experiments to ask how species in assemblages evolve through time, testing patterns inherent in Darwins Finches.


Daniel Okamoto

Professor

RM #4058
King Life Sciences

I study population dynamics with a focus on marine species. I am interested in how environmental and trophic interactions regulate fluctuations in demographics (i.e. recruitment, growth, reproduction & mortality) and how fisheries management impacts dynamics in space and time. My research integrates field & laboratory experiments, field surveys, statistical analysis, quantitative theory and simulation modeling. Focal taxa include sea urchins, macroalgae, forage fish, reef fish and abalone.


Andrew Rassweiler

RM #4059
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295


Darin R. Rokyta

Associate Professor

RM #4061
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295


Scott J. Steppan

Professor

RM #4066
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

My research is focused on understanding the origin of biological diversity. I reconstruct phylogenies of highly diverse groups like rodents and bivalves and use those phylogenies to explore biogeography, morphological evolution, rates of diversification, and how patterns of correlations among traits themselves evolve,


Trisha Terebelski

Teaching Faculty

RM #3021
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

Crustacean systematics.


Joseph Travis

Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor

RM #210
Biomedical Research Facility
Mailcode: 4340

  • Ph:(850) 644-5434
  • Can mentor graduate students in the Dept of Biological Science.

I am interested in how and why the features of animals, particularly freshwater fish and amphibians, vary from one population to another. Variation among local populations of the same species represents the earliest stage in the adaptive generation of biodiversity. It also can generate ecological differences between localities, which illustrates the complicated interplay of evolution and ecology.


Nora Underwood

Professor

RM #4008
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

  • Lab Home Page
  • Ph:(850) 644-4167
  • Can mentor graduate students in the Dept of Biological Science.

I study the ecology and evolution of plant-insect interactions, with a focus on how genotypic and phenotypic variation among individuals affects the long-term spatial and temporal dynamics of populations and communities. I work in both natural and agricultural systems, and use a combination of greenhouse and field experiments and mathematical modeling.


Alice A. Winn

Associate Professor

RM #4018
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

I am interested in how plants adapt to environments that vary in time and space, and how this contributes to patterns of phenotypic variation within and among individuals and populations. Major topics of research in my lab include the ecology and evolution of phenotypic plasticity, processes that promote or inhibit local adaptation, and the evolution of plant mating systems.


Janie L. Wulff

Associate Professor

RM #4075
King Life Sciences
Mailcode: 4295

  • Ph:(850) 644-1565
  • wulff@bio.fsu.edu
  • Can mentor graduate students in the Dept of Biological Science.